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Guitar Care for Beginners – Loog Blog Special

Loog Guitars - Guitar Care

Pic Source: Wired.com

Being a good guitarist isn’t just down to playing the right chords – it’s about looking after your guitar and caring for it. Guitars are sensitive instruments, and should be properly cared for to keep them both sounding and looking at their best. There are some simple things that we can all do to ensure we look after our guitars in the best way.

TEMPERATURE & HUMIDITY
Guitars are made out of wood and wood is a natural material. This means it can be affected by temperature and humidity (the amount of water vapor in the air). Both of these elements can affect the sound and quality of a guitar. If there is too much moisture in the air, guitars can swell – and if there is too little, this can cause the guitar to shrink and crack. Also, really warm temperatures can weaken glue, while the cold can cause the finish to crack. The best thing to do is to store your guitar somewhere like a cupboard, wardrobe, or in a corner of your room away from any direct heat sources, like a radiator. Read more

A Century of Les Paul

Les Paul

Today would’ve been the 100th birthday of a world-class tinkerer, musician and inventor: Les Paul. And no, he’s not a guitar 😉

Les Paul was born Lester William Polsfuss in Waukesha, Wisconsin, on June 9, 1915 (that’s why he’s also called “The Wizard of Waukesha”). He liked building guitars and playing them – first as a country guitarist and, later, to follow his passion: jazz. But, most of all, he is the true inventor of rock and roll.

He did that by creating the Gibson Les Paul, a creation that many musicians -like Eric Clapton or Keith Richards- prefer. It took Les Paul eight years to convince Gibson to manufacture the iconic guitar that carries his name in the 1950s, which first carried the name of the “log guitar”. Today, a Gibson Les Paul from way back then will probably set you back around $10.000-$20.000.

(And yes, we know ‘log’ and ‘Loog’ are just one ‘o’ apart. It’s one of the things we love about our little 3-strings.)

Les once told the New York Times: “When you just get mixed up, when there’s too much going on, then it’s time to pick up your guitar”. That feeling is exactly why we love making music, why we love making guitars and why we work so hard, every day, to try and make more and more people start learning toward their one-way crush to playing guitar.

So long live the Wizard of Waukesha. Our dream wouldn’t even exist without you.

Guitar Parts 101

Many Loog players are seasoned guitarists (or seasoned guitarists who got a Loog for their kids) but many others actually get a Loog to introduce themselves to the amazing world of guitar playing. We’re always talking about bridges, necks, fretboards, nuts and so on – all of these are key guitar parts that any guitar needs to effectively do its job, even the Loog.

For those who feel out of the loop once the conversation turns slightly technical, here’s a neat infographic we found online that explains what each part of a normal, six-string guitar does. The Loog works in the same way but with less strings. In any case, it’s a great guide to knowing what we mean when we talk about nuts, heads, bridges, frets and necks 😉

Click on the image to see it full-size:

Guitar PartsNew to the guitar world and there’s something else you’d like for us to explain? Ask away in the comments!