Your Kid’s Brain on Music Infographic – Updated 2015 Version

Music helps kids grow upWe’re really busy at Loog HQ working on some very, very cool new stuff we’ll be showing you shortly. (By the way, if you’re the nostalgic type, we recommend you take a long, hard look at LoogGuitars.com today before we finally bid it goodbye. It’s going to be legendary!)

But while you wait, we thought it’d be cool to update one of the posts you guys have shared the most: our “Your Kid’s Brain on Music” infographic from way back when. We’ve revamped its style and design, as well as laid it out in web form so you can access all of the information in a jiffy. But, amazingly, the “info” part of it remains the same – learning to play music still plays a huge part in brain development and all of its side-effects continue to blow people’s minds today.

Your Kid's Brain on Music

Kids learning to play music still find it easier to pick up foreign languages, even years after they stopped playing. And they also tend to get better SAT scores – both in the verbal and maths tests! Plus, music makes them nicer, helps put an end to playground bullying and is one of the best ways to make sure they stay in school – and do better at it. What’s not to love?

So here’s the Your Kid’s Brain on Music infographic in web form, and here’s where you can download a Portrait or Landscape printable version to hang up on your wall. Enjoy!

Your Kid's Brain on Music

P.S: Please send pictures if you do end up hanging it up on a wall – we love jumping up and down with excitement.

A Century of Les Paul

Les Paul

Today would’ve been the 100th birthday of a world-class tinkerer, musician and inventor: Les Paul. And no, he’s not a guitar 😉

Les Paul was born Lester William Polsfuss in Waukesha, Wisconsin, on June 9, 1915 (that’s why he’s also called “The Wizard of Waukesha”). He liked building guitars and playing them – first as a country guitarist and, later, to follow his passion: jazz. But, most of all, he is the true inventor of rock and roll.

He did that by creating the Gibson Les Paul, a creation that many musicians -like Eric Clapton or Keith Richards- prefer. It took Les Paul eight years to convince Gibson to manufacture the iconic guitar that carries his name in the 1950s, which first carried the name of the “log guitar”. Today, a Gibson Les Paul from way back then will probably set you back around $10.000-$20.000.

(And yes, we know ‘log’ and ‘Loog’ are just one ‘o’ apart. It’s one of the things we love about our little 3-strings.)

Les once told the New York Times: “When you just get mixed up, when there’s too much going on, then it’s time to pick up your guitar”. That feeling is exactly why we love making music, why we love making guitars and why we work so hard, every day, to try and make more and more people start learning toward their one-way crush to playing guitar.

So long live the Wizard of Waukesha. Our dream wouldn’t even exist without you.